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I’ve created three organizing-style assessments: one for elementary students, one for high school students, and one for adults. Each assessment introduces the participant to the concepts and importance of the four different organizing styles that my research revealed. The introduction is followed by a test to determine the best organizational method for the participant and how he can organize his time and space in alignment with his natural tendencies.

Below are excerpts of the three assessments. Complete, updated versions will be available for purchase in the coming months.

Organizing-Style Assessments:

Elemetary Student Assessment©

How do we know different children process information differently?
There’s a new brand of science called “brain function.” Through the use of modern technological processes and tolls such as Pet Scans, MRI, fMRI, and SPECT, we have been able to gather new information on how the brain develops and processes information. Since the cerebrum is naturally divided into four divisions, each one of these divisions performs a specific function. Everyone comes into the world with an advantage in one of these areas. As teachers, parents, or caregivers, we can best serve children’s development by identifying which area they most strongly relies on, and help them use their natural strengths as they learn and grow.

The benefit of promoting a child’s innate thought processes.
By understanding how children think and how they make sense of the world around them, we can help to increase the level of joy, comfort, and ease in their lives. Educating ourselves and learning how to simplify children’s day-to-day routine at school and at home, even at a young age, will ensure greater success for them and less stress on the caregiver. A classic definition of educate is: “the pulling forward of wisdom from within.” Children are bound to thrive when their natural inclinations are used to develop systems that support them. This opens up a brand-new world.

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High School Student Assessment©
“Genuine success is more likely to occur when we know who we are innately and match the majority of our
life’s activities with what our brains do easily.”
Arlene Taylor PhD

How do we know that different teens process information differently?
There’s a new brand of science called “brain function.” Through the use of modern technological processes and tolls such as Pet Scans, MRI, fMRI, and SPECT, we have been able to gather new information on how the brain develops and processes information. Since the cerebrum is naturally divided into four divisions, each one of these divisions performs a specific function. Everyone comes into the world with an advantage in one of these areas. As teachers, parents, or caregivers, we can best serve teen development by identifying which area they most strongly relies on, and help them use their natural strengths as they learn and grow.

The benefit of promoting a teen’s innate thought processes.
Understanding how young adults think and how they make sense of the world around them can greatly increase the level of joy and comfort in their lives. Educating ourselves and learning how to simplify their day-to-day routine at school and at home, will ensure greater success for them and less stress on the caregiver. A classic definition of educate is: “the pulling forward of wisdom from within.” Why not rely on the wisdom that is naturally present, create awareness about it, and develop systems that support the teen? This opens up a brand-new world.

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Adult Assessment©

How do we know that different people process information differently?
There’s a new brand of science called “brain function.” Through the use of modern technological processes and tools such as Pet Scans, MRI, fMRI, and SPECT, we are now able to gather new information on how the brain develops and processes information. The cerebrum is naturally divided into four areas and each one of these divisions performs a specific function. Everyone comes into the world with an advantage in one of these areas, and discovering which area is “driving someone is invaluable. With this knowledge one can construct a lifestyle that is easier to sustain, especially when it comes to the realm of organizing.

One’s innate thought processes are a great foundation for a well-organized life.
When it comes to the realm of organizing, many of us never feel on top of it. On any given day, we might allow our busyness and multitasking to carry us away, leaving a “little bit of chaos” in their wake. Before we know it, this “little bit of chaos” is created every day, and we get so far behind that it feels nearly impossible to “get out from under.” If we then try to organize ourselves with an approach that is not natural to us, our efforts may be too difficult to sustain, and ultimately not work. What I’ve discovered is everyone has his or her own way to get organized, and when that method is employed, he or she has a very good chance of staying organized.

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